humansofnewyork
humansofnewyork:

"When he first came to us, he wasn’t talking. He was about four years old, but we knew nothing else about him. Occasionally, he’d imitate the other children, but he’d express no thoughts of his own. He couldn’t tell us anything about his home, his family, or where he came from. To make matters worse, aid workers had further confused him by suggesting hometowns to him— which he had readily agreed to. So we started with a completely blank slate. We drew a house on a piece of paper, and we said: ‘Is this your home?’ And he said: ‘No! You forgot the gate!’ So we drew a gate. And he said: ‘But you forgot the tree!’ So we drew a tree. 
Piece by piece, day by day, we filled in a picture of his home. He was still very reserved and traumatized, so the process took over a month. But we met in the safety of my office every day, and we figured it out. It was like putting together a puzzle. The saddest moment was when we drew his father. ‘You have to draw him laying down,’ the boy said. ‘I tried to get him to come with me, but he wouldn’t.’ 
When we eventually used the drawings to identify the boy’s hometown and find his mother, she confirmed our fears. The boy had disappeared after seeing his father get shot.”

(Juba, South Sudan)

humansofnewyork:

"When he first came to us, he wasn’t talking. He was about four years old, but we knew nothing else about him. Occasionally, he’d imitate the other children, but he’d express no thoughts of his own. He couldn’t tell us anything about his home, his family, or where he came from. To make matters worse, aid workers had further confused him by suggesting hometowns to him— which he had readily agreed to. So we started with a completely blank slate. We drew a house on a piece of paper, and we said: ‘Is this your home?’ And he said: ‘No! You forgot the gate!’ So we drew a gate. And he said: ‘But you forgot the tree!’ So we drew a tree.
Piece by piece, day by day, we filled in a picture of his home. He was still very reserved and traumatized, so the process took over a month. But we met in the safety of my office every day, and we figured it out. It was like putting together a puzzle. The saddest moment was when we drew his father. ‘You have to draw him laying down,’ the boy said. ‘I tried to get him to come with me, but he wouldn’t.’
When we eventually used the drawings to identify the boy’s hometown and find his mother, she confirmed our fears. The boy had disappeared after seeing his father get shot.”

(Juba, South Sudan)

explore-blog

We begin to find and become ourselves when we notice how we are already found, already truly, entirely, wildly, messily, marvelously who we were born to be. The only problem is that there is also so much other stuff, typically fixations with how people perceive us, how to get more of the things that we think will make us happy, and with keeping our weight down. So the real issue is how do we gently stop being who we aren’t? How do we relieve ourselves of the false fronts of people-pleasing and affectation, the obsessive need for power and security, the backpack of old pain, and the psychic Spanx that keeps us smaller and contained?

Here’s how I became myself: mess, failure, mistakes, disappointments, and extensive reading; limbo, indecision, setbacks, addiction, public embarrassment, and endless conversations with my best women friends; the loss of people without whom I could not live, the loss of pets that left me reeling, dizzying betrayals but much greater loyalty, and overall, choosing as my motto William Blake’s line that we are here to learn to endure the beams of love.

reasonsmysoniscrying
reasonsmysoniscrying:

reasonsmykidissmiling:

This type of story reminds me how amazing sports can be.  Last night, Rochester Red Wings catcher Chris Herrmann spotted a fan outside the stadium and gave him his all of his used gear. See, Herrmann doesn’t need the gear with the Red Wings colors anymore. He was recalled to the big leagues last night; to the Minnesota Twins. This simple act turned a great time at the ball game into a night this boy will never ever forget. I now know who my favorite baseball player is.If you love this as much as I do, send The Twins a note and tell them so!

Story and Photo Submitted By: Mark S.Location: Rochester, NY

I love stories like these, especially from my hometown AAA team!

reasonsmysoniscrying:

reasonsmykidissmiling:

This type of story reminds me how amazing sports can be.  Last night, Rochester Red Wings catcher Chris Herrmann spotted a fan outside the stadium and gave him his all of his used gear. See, Herrmann doesn’t need the gear with the Red Wings colors anymore. He was recalled to the big leagues last night; to the Minnesota Twins. This simple act turned a great time at the ball game into a night this boy will never ever forget. I now know who my favorite baseball player is.

If you love this as much as I do, send The Twins a note and tell them so!

Story and Photo Submitted By: Mark S.
Location: Rochester, NY

I love stories like these, especially from my hometown AAA team!